The Ailing Welfare Service: Reforms of Health and Social Care Needs Proper Scrutiny

Change is part of a humans’ existence therefore, it is unavoidable and timeless. This concept is interrelated and insensitive to current occurrences within the wider welfare institutions in the UK’s health and social care sectors in particular. At present, health and social services are yet again undergoing a painstaking restructuring that is creating psychological and physical stresses to the entire workforce and consumers. This trajectory is building uncertain future due to continuous re-organizations, change of emphasis and redirections of care delivery to the general public. Ironically, people are not sure where their future and loyalty lies as changes in the system is triggering great worries to all concerned.

On reflection, health and social services went through a huge conscientious change in 1990s (The NHS and Community Care Act), that reconfigured the welfare systems to what many practitioners and managers thought would be a modern establishment. However, the New Labour government in 1997 to 2010 changed the prospect and redesigned it to new approaches such as personalization of services (Direct payments, Cash for Care and Personal Budgets) that transformed services delivery within the sectors. Change can make or break staff commitment, maximization of services, profitability or industrial disputes between the management and employees, this owing to mishaps within industrial relations’ policies and protocols.

Changing organizational cultures as well as philosophy and employee’s terms of reference requires effective governance and scrutiny in order to ensure health and social care reforms work for the benefits of all. The key to making the reforms work as planned would be to safeguard effective analysis of all new policy directives and structures. It is now questionable whether the “New Ways of Working” is capable of changing the fabrics and structures of the welfare services in the UK. The main themes of the overhauls are to reduce costs/budgets, staffing and improving quality and standards of services.

Decision making in some departments or services are proving to be irrational because costs are escalating, standards declining and waiting lists for assessment increasing across many social services departments. Most quality newspapers affirm that the coalition may have done everything they could to start implementing health and social care modifications before being properly examined. But, without careful considerations and good governance the plans would be an unmitigated disaster. That notwithstanding, the speed of restructuring and reallocation of services have produced an unsettling atmosphere for most health/social care workers and managers. The government’ itinerary to continue with reforms and their failure to allow time for study or to win the professional’s backing for these radical plans have been challenging to the wider community of experts and the public at large.

Considering the clamor amongst practitioners and clinicians, the question is, would the governments’ defiant be regarded as democratic or dictetorism? In contrast, it is believed that democracy means “government for the people and by the people”. If that is the case, the coalition would have itself to be blamed for any criticisms regarding their actions. The dismantling of the (PCT) Primary Care Trusts throughout the country in the next two or three years could be termed as political vandalism of tax payer’s money and good governance.

Similarly, most strategic health and local government authorities have expressed concerns regarding cutbacks on their budget, which could have huge ramifications to services for older people and other vulnerable groups such as people with disabilities and mental health. This has also been widely highlighted by a large proportion of the professional bodies such as the Nursing and Midwifery Council, British Medical Association and BBC 2 News Night in particular. The criticisms of the government is now without seasoning because health and social care organizations needs to double their expected cuts in order to remain afloat.

The growth of older people and their increasing demand for care is now unprecedented and becoming a threat to the welfare service and public services. This is despite extraordinary support from informal caregivers who are believed to have saved the government over eleven (£11bn) billion pounds a year. That notwithstanding, change is needed to reduce duplications within the system therefore, what is desirable now is a long term strategic alliance between all stakeholders (the national and local governments, health and social care and family members etc.). This would guarantee and strengthen collaborative services and minimization of costs and wastage within the sectors involved. Yet, judging from the current state of the economy both the macro and micro variable, it is certain that change is foreseeable in order to meet the challenges presented by the turmoil in the financial market and escalation of cost to maintain health and social care.

However, the difficulty in planning, management and administration of the ageing universal service in the UK has been made a lot harder as a result of disproportionately deep cuts to local authorities. The Big Society agenda indicated that the government should devolve responsibilities to the community, individuals, families and the third sector. By all assumptions, this would ensure that service users’ care would continue while restructuring is in progress. In hindsight, the key to making the reforms work would be to safeguard effective control and scrutiny of all the workflow patterns and services delivery. Practically, this has proved overwhelming for the organizations and management as details of the shake-up is superficial in terms of economics and socio-politics in line with social policy in the UK.

Presently, the government seems unconcerned and flustered regarding the “House of Common’s” health select committee’s proposal that councillors should be appointed to have seats on the boards of GPs consortia. On reflection, the quality and capacity of the representatives of some voluntary bodies such as: patients/service user’s liaison body and the local involvement network agencies could be inconsistent and lacking because of clinical and financial expertise. Thus, as a scrutiny committee, it would in practice be problematic to work closely with Health Watch, as well as with the health and wellbeing boards.

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Applying for Health and Social Care Jobs

Applying for health and social care jobs is one of the smartest things you can do in today’s slow economy. Health and social care jobs fall into some of the categories of employment that will always be in need of workers because they will never run out of clients. You have undoubtedly heard the old adage that a liquor store is busy when times are good, and a liquor store is busy when times are bad, so a fool proof way to make a living is to own a liquor store. Well, when you deal with human ailments and human elements and no matter how poor the economy gets there will still be humans and they will still get sick.

To apply for health and social care jobs you can go to all of the hospitals, clinics, doctor offices, labs, dentist’s offices, therapist’s offices, and other medical establishments in your town. You will manage to get your application into about one half of the places that hire health and social care jobs applicants by using this method of job searching.

Health and social care jobs are the ones held by therapists, nurses, the nursing assistants, the doctor, the dentist, the hygienist, and the many other licensed professionals that take care of humans when they are sick. These jobs are also filled by people who sit with the elderly while their family members have to go to jobs and have to go to other engagements. They do the laundry for the elderly and they visit with them and cook their meals.

Recruitment agencies often hire these professionals for the companies that hire them. A recruiting agency has more time to devote to finding the right person to fill the opening rather than having to hire someone that may not be the best choice for the opening.

Recruitment agencies will take care of the background checks that are necessary before a person can be hired to work in these types of positions. The recruiters also see to it that the drug screening is done and that records of any licenses that the people hold are obtained and proven. Licenses for people that do this type of work need to be redone every couple of years. Just because a person went to nursing school does not mean that they have kept up with their continuing education credits or kept their license current and good.

When a recruiting agency finds an employee that they think will make the company that is hiring a good employee they will set up a final interview with the human resources agent in the company that has the job opening. Their main goal is to be sending the right person to the right job so that the company gets the help they need and do not have to turn the people down and keep having more people brought around.

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Hiring People for Health and Social Care Jobs

Health and social care jobs require a higher level of personnel experience than the jobs at the building material store require. Health and social care jobs involve the licensed professionals that will be working with people who are in need of doctors, nurses, nurse’s aids, rehabilitation services, and therapists.

Health and social care jobs cannot be filled by just anyone that answers an employee needed sign. The people that work these types of jobs must be compassionate individuals that are able to empathize with the patient they are dealing with. This goes for the people that have to go to school and receive licenses to hold the health and social care jobs positions they apply for and it counts for the people that apply to sit with an ailing person while their family is away from home.

Individuals applying for the positions of caring for or working with the elderly need to pass background checks to make sure they are not criminals that might would take advantage of the elderly person. These background checks can be done by the company that is looking to hire the employee or they can be done by the recruitment agency the company hires to find appropriate candidates.

The recruitment agencies that oversee the application processes for these types of positions will likely go ahead and do the drug and alcohol screening on all possible employees before they send them to the company for a final interview. This will assure the company that when they start to interview the candidate they can hire them on the spot if they really like them.

The recruiters that look for employee and employer match ups hope that the individuals they send to a company will be liked and hired immediately. It is the goal of these professionals to find candidates to hire that are qualified for the work so they are not wasting the time of the company by sending over people who are less than qualified.

Of course qualifications are not all determined by the educational background the person has or even by the work experience they have. Some of the things that make a person qualified include the area in which they live. The company will want to know that the people they hire will be on time for work and they live close enough that if a need arises they can come in early or they can stay late. People with long commutes are not as flexible as people who live closer to their work places.

The amount of enthusiasm for the job at hand will also be considered as a part of the qualifications for people who wish to work in health related industries. They will be working with the sick and the elderly so their outlook on life and their enthusiasm will reflect on the way they make their patients feel. In the health care industry you must be able to show a level of concern without becoming emotionally engaged with the client.

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